big

NOOP.NL | The Creative Networker

The Big Agile Practices Survey Report (Part 2)

11/05/2009

Pie This is Part 2 (<< go back to Part 1 | go to Part 3 >>)

This is not a perfect survey. In fact, it is probably a lousy one. I decided not to ask the participants for any demographic data (locations, job titles, organization size, etc.) The main reason was that this would further increase the size of the survey, which was already quite large. I never like those kinds of demographic questions myself, and I feared that the number of participants would drop if I included any more questions.

Of course, lack of demographic data also meant that I could not compensate for selection bias. But I don't believe it would have made much of a difference. This survey was promoted by dozens of different bloggers, web sites and twitterers, and we can therefore expect a reasonable differentiation among the participants. And looking at the results, I think we succeeded in that.

So yes, the statistics are probably skewed, but not so much as to be unusable…

Note: you can also analyze the data yourself in big on-line sortable tables: here (created by Mario Menger) and here (created by Maciej Gren).


Which practices were considered AGILE, BUT NOT IMPORTANT?
Area Best practice Score
Design System Metaphor 67.8%
Organization Scrum of Scrums 63.0%
Design CRC Cards 61.2%
Requirements Planning Poker 60.9%
Process Kanban Board 59.2%
Process Story Points 58.9%
Construction Pair-Programming / Pairing 58.5%
Organization Scrum Master 57.5%
Construction Behavior Driven Development 56.3%
Process Burn Down Charts / Burn Up Charts 56.0%

Comments: These last few top 10 lists might be the most interesting results of the survey. I have compared the percentage of people claiming that a practice is agile with the number of people saying the practice is nevertheless not important. The difference between these results led to this list of practices that are agile, but not important, with the System Metaphor being a clear winner.


Which practices were considered IMPORTANT, BUT NOT AGILE?
Area Best practice Score
Construction Configuration Management 22.0%
Process Risk Management 22.4%
Construction Source Control / Version Control 24.0%
Construction Issue Tracking / Bug Tracking 25.0%
Testing System Testing 26.3%
Process Root Cause Analysis / 5 Whys 29.2%
Construction Coding Style / Coding Guidelines / Coding Standard 30.0%
Testing Integration Testing 30.4%
Testing Smoke Testing / Build Verification Test 30.8%
Design User Interface Prototyping 31.8%

Comments: This is the reverse list of practices that are considered important, but not agile. In this case Configuration Management is the winner, closely followed by Risk Management. It seems people think that agile does not have risk management built-in, as some agilists claim, and agile alone is not enough in managing risk, as I have claimed before.


Which practices were considered AGILE, BUT NOT APPLIED?
Area Best practice Score
Design System Metaphor 77.3%
Organization Scrum of Scrums 75.8%
Process Kanban Board 74.8%
Construction Behavior Driven Development 71.5%
Design CRC Cards 70.1%
Construction Pair-Programming / Pairing 69.9%
Process Value Stream Mapping 68.1%
Requirements Minimum Marketable Features 65.2%
Organization On-Site Customer / Product Owner 64.5%
Process Lead Time / Cycle Time 64.4%

Comments: This is the top 10 list of practices that people consider to be agile, but are not applying in their organizations. These are probably some of the most context-specific practices, that people will only use when applicable. Again, there are no testing practices here.


Which practices were considered APPLIED, BUT NOT AGILE?
Area Best practice Score
Construction Issue Tracking / Bug Tracking 23.8%
Construction Source Control / Version Control 24.0%
Construction Configuration Management 28.6%
Construction Coding Style / Coding Guidelines / Coding Standard 31.2%
Testing System Testing 31.7%
Testing Integration Testing 32.6%
Process Risk Management 36.1%
Testing Smoke Testing / Build Verification Test 38.0%
Testing Unit Testing 41.4%
Construction Software Metrics / Code Metrics & Analysis 41.5%

Comments: And here we have the reverse list: practices that people apply in their organizations, but do not consider to be agile. It is quite interesting to see these are (almost) only practices from the Construction and Testing categories. Issue Tracking makes its first appearance in the top position.


Which practices were considered IMPORTANT, BUT NOT APPLIED?
Area Best practice Score
Process Lead Time / Cycle Time 29.2%
Process Value Stream Mapping 29.7%
Requirements Minimum Marketable Features 30.9%
Process Root Cause Analysis / 5 Whys 30.9%
Design Domain Driven Design 33.6%
Requirements Product Vision / Vision Statement 34.2%
Process Kanban Board 34.4%
Requirements Usage Scenarios 34.7%
Construction Behavior Driven Development 34.8%
Organization On-Site Customer / Product Owner 35.7%

Comments: We're almost near the end… This is the list of practices that people consider to be important, but that they are not applying in their organizations. We see the lean practices dominating the results, indicating that many people are interested in lean, but they are not applying the practices yet.


Which practices were considered APPLIED, BUT NOT IMPORTANT?
Area Best practice Score
Construction Issue Tracking / Bug Tracking 51.2%
Requirements Planning Poker 50.3%
Construction Source Control / Version Control 50.0%
Organization Scrum Master 49.6%
Process Timeboxing / Fixed Sprints / Fixed Iteration Length 49.1%
Process Iteration Planning / Planning Game / Sprint Planning 48.9%
Construction Coding Style / Coding Guidelines / Coding Standard 48.8%
Process Burn Down Charts / Burn Up Charts 48.4%
Process Sprint Backlog 48.2%
Requirements Requirement Prioritization 48.1%

Comments: And finally the reversed list: the practices that are applied, but that people think are not really important. Issue Tracking is topping the list again.


This was Part 2 (<< go back to Part 1 | go to Part 3 >>)

Note: you can also analyze the data yourself in big on-line sortable tables: here (created by Mario Menger) and here (created by Maciej Gren).

Twitter TwitterRss SubscribeEmail NewsletterDelicious Bookmarks

Latest, greatest and favoritest posts:
The Big List of Agile Practices
Top 100 Blogs for Developers (Q1 2009)
Top 50 New Software Development Books

This article is written by on in Top Lists. Jurgen Appelo is at Happy Melly. Connect with Jurgen Appelo on .

This article was posted in: